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Member John All in Popular Mechanics · May 31, 2012

Popular Mechanics asked the question, “Why Does Everyone Climb Everest in May?”. Member John All had the answers for them. Many of us probably know the answer but… Read the article on popularmechanics.com.

Help the AAJ With Google Earth Pro · May 31, 2012

The AAJ is looking for people who have Google Earth Pro and wouldn’t mind replicating a GE view in higher resolution than we can get it the normal way. Do you have it? Care to help? We’d be much obliged! Please respond here in the comments or (better yet) write directly to the editor at john@johnharlin.net. A hearty thank you!

Represent the Club in Italy—One Week Remaining to Apply! · May 31, 2012

The AAC will send two lucky members to this year’s Second International Trad Climbing Meeting organized by the Club Alpino Accademico Italiano (CAAI). The CAAI, with the sponsorship of Alpine Club of Italy, is organizing this international event—similar to the American Alpine Club’s International Climbers’ Meet—in Ceresole Reale, Orco Valley, near Torino, Italy.

The objective is to allow the communication of experiences among international climbers, promote climbing—in particular its traditional style—and showcase the Orco Valley, a gem in the climbing world, known for its historical relevance to the development of modern climbing in Italy and it’s natural beauty & stunning granite lines. Read more and find application information on Inclined.

An American Alpine Club History by William Lowell Putnam · May 31, 2012

The American Alpine Club’s Honorary President, William Lowell Putnam gave this speech at the Club’s 2011 Board Meeting in Flagstaff, Arizona. We’ve reproduced it because it’s a fantastic speech, broad in scope and incredibly rich in Club history—and mountaineering history. Read Mr. Putnam’s speech on Inclined, or check out the photo gallery that goes along with it.

Our Members At Work · May 30, 2012

You can read the whole article on the Wall Street Journal website, but the long and short of it is that in addition to all the famous folks on Everest this season, there were also scientists at Base Camp, checking on sleep patterns, cognitive performance, respiratory, and cardiovascular performance. Seems like our members are everywhere!

Richards Accepts Rowell Award at Mountainfilm · May 25, 2012

Climber, photographer, and filmmaker Cory Richards accepted the Galen Rowell Award for the Art of Adventure in person this evening at Mountainfilm in Telluride. Administered by the AAC, this award honors an adventurer whose artistic passion illuminates the wild places of the world and whose accomplishments significantly benefit both the environment and the people who inhabit these lands and regions.

Executive Director Phil Powers and AAC member (and past Rowell Award winner) Jimmy Chin presented the award at the Sheridan Opera House on Friday before a special showing of House of Cards, a film about Chin’s ascent of Meru’s Shark’s Fin with Conrad Anker and Renan Ozturk (look for a feature about this ascent in the 2012 American Alpine Journal, out in August).

Richards was not expecting to be present for the ceremony. He fell ill on Everest at the end of April; while disappointed that he had to return home early, Richards was thrilled to be at Mountainfilm this year and to accept the award in person.

“It’s not only special to share adventures, but it’s vital,” Richards said. “We are all a part of the challenges our world is facing—we know what we have to lose.”

In support of conservation and adventure storytelling through film, the American Alpine Club is a Camp II sponsor of Mountainfilm.

Friday AAJ Reports—May 25, 2012 · May 25, 2012

The American Alpine Journal never fails to satisfy your need to read about incredible ascents (or attempts) worldwide.

Naran (3,884m)—Despite “less-than-optimal” circumstances, Reynolds and his partner managed to summit a peak that he says has the makings of an Altai and Mongolian classic.

Changwatang (6,130m)—Grobel and his party were surprised—and, initially, offended—when they discovered that a road had been built into the valley, making it accessible to commercialism for the first time in its history. The presence of tourism forced them to consider their own role in the previously remote region.

First winter ascent of the north face of Dingjung Ri/Rima Mancho (6,263m)—Parkin wasn’t scared off by the huge rocks thrown through his tent as he slept at base camp early in his trip; he managed to make the first winter ascent of the peak after two very chilly bivouacs.

Gaurishankar (7,135m)—The summit of Gaurishankar has been reached only three times, each time by this route.

Jannu (7,711m)—The climb was interrupted when a member of the team fell into a crevasse, breaking several ribs.

Sanctuary Peak (6,025m) and Hopeless Peak (6,036m)—Beautiful weather and a remote location meant the trip started off nicely for Grobel and his party, but their expedition—which included an alpine-style ascent of a small, unnamed peak—nearly ended in disaster.

Kyajo Ri (6,186m); Kusum Kanguru (6,370m)—Sometimes what you don’t climb is just as exciting as what you do: Dare and his teammates were unable to make their objective for a variety of reasons, but they believe their route—though challenging—to be climbable.

Athahra Saya Khola Himal (6,767m), southeast ridge over Hindu Himal (6,306m) and Lilia Peak (6,425m)—While the peaks in this area aren’t technical or aesthetically impressive, they are very important, geographically speaking: they are the key to accessing the vast glacial plateaus below.

Roma (5,407m) and Danphe Sail (6,103m)—Neither Roma nor Danphe had been attempted prior to Ohnishi’s visit; thanks to an infectious bugbite, both peaks remain unclimbed.

An attempt and a tragedy on Thulagi (7,059m)—Bandalet and his party had attempted to climb Thulagi previously (see their report in AAJ 2011), but this attempt ended in tragedy: some of their supplies were recovered from the summit ridge, but their remains have not been found.

Bo White Travels to Tajikistan · May 24, 2012

Telling the stories of our members is important to us because it helps the community understand who makes up that community.  Member Bo White traveled to Tajikistan once for research and was lured back by the peaks...Read more on Inclined.

Grand Teton “Pack Out” Program · May 23, 2012

The summer of 2012 starts the second decade of a human waste pack out program in Grand Teton National Park. Begun in 2001 to address human waste concerns in high alpine areas primarily with climbers, the program has expanded to include overnight campers, hikers and  even day users. In recent years, the program has been fully funded by a grant from 1% for the Tetons that is administered by the American Alpine Club.

GTNP is recording positive results from this waste-bag give away program that also includes  user education. The Park sees it as an integral part of its mission to preserve and protect our  exceptional places while still inviting people from all over the world to enjoy them. Read the full report from the Park Service.

 

Trad Climb in Italy, Represent the Club, Apply Now! · May 22, 2012

The AAC will send two lucky members to this year’s Second International Trad Climbing Meeting organized by the Club Alpino Accademico Italiano (CAAI). The CAAI, with the sponsorship of Alpine Club of Italy, is organizing this international event—similar to the American Alpine Club’s International Climbers’ Meet—in Ceresole Reale, Orco Valley, near Torino, Italy.

The objective is to allow the communication of experiences among international climbers, promote climbing—in particular its traditional style—and showcase the Orco Valley, a gem in the climbing world, known for its historical relevance to the development of modern climbing in Italy and it’s natural beauty & stunning granite lines. Read more and find application information on Inclined.

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